Biography of George H. Hudson
Tulare County, CA Biographies





GEORGE H. HUDSON.
For the last quarter of a century members of the Hudson family have been more or less intimately connected with the business and transportation interests and public affairs of the San Joaquin valley, particularly in Fresno and Tulare counties. Charles E. Hudson, an uncle of George H. Hudson of this review came from Indiana in 1880 and entered the employ of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company as a fireman on the division between Fresno and Bakersfield, making his home in Tulare. In due time he was promoted to the position of engineman and is still running between Fresno and Oakland.

James H. Hudson, the father of George H. Hudson, was born in Fortville, Indiana, but came to California as a young man. For some time he held the position of railroad conductor on the Truckee Division of the Southern Pacific Railroad. In 1879 he located in Tulare, but continued to follow railroading until 1888, when he opened a general store in Fresno. He continued in the mercantile business until his death, which occurred on December 1, 1916. After coming to California he married Miss Clara Thom, who is still living and is now a resident of Berkeley, California. They were the parents of three sons and a daughter, viz.: George H., the subject of this sketch; Mrs. Laura C. Bodfish of New York; James Harrison, late of Oakland, California, who died November 27, 1924; and Jenness L., of Berkeley.

George H. Hudson was born in Tulare, Tulare county, California, October 16, 1881. He attended the schools of Fresno and Newark, Alameda county, California, until about the beginning of the Spanish-American war in 1898. He enlisted as a private in Company M., Forty third United States Volunteer Infantry, which regiment was ordered to the Philippine Islands in 1899, to assist in quelling the Filipino insurrection. Young Hudson remained on duty in the islands for twenty nine months. For the greater part of that time his regiment constituted a part of the command of Major General Henry T. Allen, who distinguished himself as a commanding officer on the battle fields of France in the late World war. In 1902 Mr. Hudson was discharged with the rank of sergeant and returned to his home in California. Soon after this he entered the employ of the Southern Pacific Railroad Company as a locomotive fireman, but a little later he became associated with his father in the latter's store in Fresno. In the meantime his father had, in 1880, homesteaded a tract of land north of Traver, Tulare county, and planted eighty acres in peach and fig trees. This place he sold in 1888 and later he bought other ranches in Fresno county. After the Philippine war the son was employed in looking after these ranches until after the death of his father in December, 1916.

Mr. Hudson was appointed a special agent of the United States department of justice in the spring of 1917, and assigned to the northern division of the southern district of California, with headquarters in Fresno. This district includes eight counties. He and four of his associates were directly connected with the arrest, trial and conviction of nearly three hundred members of the Industrial Workers of the World usually referred to as the "I.W.W." - in the federal courts in Chicago, Kansas City and Sacramento. Mr. Hudson was a witness in the United States district court of Chicago when one hundred and ninety nine of the "I.W.W." were convicted and sentenced to prison for disloyalty. One of the defendants in this case was the man known as "Big Bill Haywood", who forfeited a bond and escaped to Russia. Later in 1917 Mr. Hudson again appeared as a witness in Kansas City, when forty seven "I.W.W." were convicted and not long afterward his testimony assisted in securing the conviction of forty seven more in Sacramento.

In December, 1921, Mr. Hudson retired from the department of justice and located in Tipton, Tulare county. Here in 1922 he planted twenty acres of the Fresno Beauty table grapes and during the next year spent most of his time in improving and developing his vineyard. In August, 1923, he was appointed county prohibition enforcement director by Fred C. Scott, then district attorney, and this position he still holds. His previous experience as an agent of the department of justice has enabled him to prove a valuable officer in the enforcement of the Eighteenth Amendment and the Volstead Act.

Mr. Hudson married Miss Effie Hobson, a native of Missouri, and to this union has been born one son: George L., who married Miss Bessie McIntyre and lives in Tulare county. While living in Fresno, Mr. Hudson became identified with several of the fraternal societies. He belongs to Fresno Lodge No. 247, F. & A. M.; is a thirty second degree Scottish Rite Mason in the Fresno Consistory; Fresno Camp, United Spanish War Veterans; Fresno Lodge No. 439, Benevolent Protective Order of Elks; and Pyramid No. 10, Order of Sciots. He also belongs to Islam Temple Nobles of the Mystic Shrine of San Francisco.

From:
History of Tulare County, California
By: Kathleen Edwards Small
and
Kings County, California
By: J. Larry Smith
The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company
Chicago 1926


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