Biography of Mr. & Mrs Myron M. Dikeman
Rutland County, Vt. Biographies





DIKEMAN, MR. AND MRS. MYRON M. Frederick Dikeman, grandfather of Myron M. and George W. Dykeman, has been mentioned in the sketch of the life of the person last named. He was four times married, the two brothers just mentioned being descended from his first wife.

Myron M. Dykeman, the oldest son of Perry Dikeman, was born on the 29th of June, 1809, on the farm now owned by Willis Peters. He came to the farm he now occupies when a mere child, and has always lived on the same excepting two years when he lived within sight of it. On the 3d of September, 1829, he married Elvira Jewell Robinson. Like his brother, he has steadily added to the talents given him until he has become one of the three wealthiest men in town. He has never entertained any ambition for holding office, but has, nevertheless, served the town as selectman, lister, and in other capacities. In the year 1875 he was appointed one of a committee of three to settle some insolvent estates in this town, and they were settled to the satisfaction of all, without going through a court of insolvency. He is a stockholder in the First National Bank, the Castleton Bank, and the Killington Bank, Merchant's Bank, and Rutland Trust Company of Rutland. He held stock also in the old Rutland National Bank, and lost $3,000 by the failure of the bank in Poultney a number of years ago.

Mrs. Myron M. Dikeman was born on the 11th of January, 1809, on the farm in Hubbardton now occupied by A. S. Kilbourn. Her father, Eli Robinson, son of Isaiah Robinson, was born on the shore of Lake Bomoseen, and was noted for his fondness for hunting. In 1844 he went to Wisconsin, and in 186o died in Minnesota in his eigthy fourth year. His father came from Sharon, Conn.; his mother, Sarah Foote, was a relative of Hon. Solomon Foote.

Mrs. Dikeman's mother's father, Seymour Doud, was an early settler in Hubhardton, and lived on the farm now owned by Zehulon Baker. He was killed by the falling of a tree. He was also from Sharon, Conn. Mrs. Dikeman is a member of the Congregational Church and has been for many years.

Following are the names of the children of Mr. and Mrs. Dikeman, together with the dates of their birth, and of the death of those not now living: Maria B. Dikeman was born May 8, 1830; was twice married, and died January 8, 1863. M. Munson, born October 14, 1831, married July 4, 1855, and now lives with his father. Schuyler M., born January 21, 1833; married October 6, 1864; is the present town clerk. Orphena M., born May 19, 1834; married October 5, 1853; died April 7, 1859. Sarah Jane, born April 9, 1836; married to Stephen B. Hatch, of Parishville, N. V., September 29, 1864. Henrietta. born February 25, 1839; married December 25, 1861; died July 3, 1863. Ellen E., born April 16, 1851; married June 25, 1865; died November 14, 1869. Harvey G., born February 21, 1843; died unmarried, November 21, 1864. Emma L., born June 15, 1845; married October 13, 1869; now the wife of her second husband, John W. Hulett, of Bennington, Vt. Zilpha A., born March 31, 1847; married June 13, 1871; died May 8, 1881. Albert G., born June 8, 1849, died unmarried July 30, 1875.

The life of a farmer in a country cleared of forests and wild beasts is usually uneventful. Occasionally, however, a single incident will afford excitement enough to last a whole lifetime. Such is the case with the subject of this sketch. On the 14th of February, 1841, while operating a water power saw mill which then stood on his place, Mr. Dikeman was repairing the machinery over the shaft of the wheel, when his footing gave way, and he fell about twelve feet, one foot being violently forced into the flutter wheel, which in its revolution caught the heavy heel of his boot between the bucket and the apron, and stopped the mill. He was held a prisoner in this perilous and uncomfortable position for about a half hour, with the ice cold water pouring upon him by the barrelfuls. His cries finally reached the ears of the neighbors, who soon found and released him. Strange to say, no bones were broken, though Mr. Dikeman was confined for two weeks to the house, and for about twelve hours suffered great agony from the wrenching.

Mr. and Mrs. Dykeman celebrated the fiftieth anniversary of their wedding on the 3d of December, 1879, when they entertained about a hundred of their friends. The affair was as enjoyable as it is rare.

From:
History of Rutland County, Vermont
Edited by: H. P. Smith and W. S. Rann
D. Mason & Co., Publishers
Syracuse, N. Y. 1886


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